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profiles chinese artist and dissident ai wei wei, whose work is on exhibit in the u.s. for the first time. >> if we can change ourselves, that means part of society will change. if more people can do so, then we can change the society. >> woodruff: and we look at what the federal trade commission calls a "digital danger zone," mobile applications that gather data about children. >> what needs to be done is a way for parents to easily at any time see exactly what's being collected and who they are sharing that information with. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: michigan, a s
we have left this evening. as always, thank you for being with us. let not your heart be troubled. dana perino in for greta. >> who the president be spending time with someone like psy instead of getting america offer the cliff? senator lindsey graham is telling the president, time to man up. >> the hits keep on coming. >> you may be shocked, you may be debris. some of you be happy, but when you hear this you will definitely have an opinion. >> obama wants to go over the cliff. let me rephrase that. if we go over the cliff, he won't care. >> how about manning up here, mr. president? >> at some point either you'll go over the cliff or find some kind of dramatic concession to the president. >> he's been to pennsylvania. tomorrow he's going to detroit. it's now time to governor. the election is over. he's a small guy. he's afraid of his own party. >> fiscal cliff negotiations proving once again that obama is never worried about trying to fix the problem. >> how about manning up here, mr. president. >> all he's trying to do is fix the blame. >> the president won. he wants to prove he
governor rick snyder. governor snyder, thank you very much for joining us. tell me why now and why this issue, why take this on? this is not what you campaigned on. >> no. i appreciate that, andrea. it really goes back to last summertime. the labor movement, labor leaders were pushing forward something called proposal 2. they were doing signatures to put on it the ballot, which would have been a massive overreach into michigan's constitution regarding collective bargaining. i believe in collective bargaining, but this was way over the top, and i asked him not to go forward, and the reasons i said is you are going to start a very divisive discussion regarding collective bargaining first, but it also will get into right to work. it will create a big stir about right to work in addition to collective bargaining. the voters spoke in november and dramatically voted down proposal two, but then this right to work discussion just continued to escalate and was becoming very divisive. the way i viewed it, it's on the table. it's a hot issue. let's show some leadership, so i stepped up to say
. governor rick snider. he's going to be joining us live from the office in the state capitol. don't miss this. liz: dangerously close to going over the cliff. you know the date, december 31st. coming up, exclusively on fox business, former treasury secretary paul o'neill as sides dwindle own spendings, he has what needs to be done to get budget under control, easy ways to cut it and who should carry the burden. david: before the busy hour, what drove the markets with today's data download. stocks pushing up for hopes of a deal in the beltway. all three indexes in the green, hosting the three straight day of gains, s&p higher for the first time in two weeks. technology and health care led today's gainers. well, oil posting its first gain in six sessions today, edges higher after prices fell 4% over the past five trading sessions. crude closing the day up 23 cents a barrel at $85.79. u.s. small business sentiment plunging in november to the lowest level in nearly three years. national federation of independent businesses saying the index fell more than five points last month to 87.5, and 3
, for inspiring actors. >> oh, absolutely. >> don't act. >> yeah. that's what robert mitchum used to write. nar on his scripts, no acting required. >> thank you, we appreciate it. >> we look forward to seeing the show. i'm excited. i'm going. >> we will go. >>> we have to wrap it up. mike, if it's way too early, what time is it? >> "morning joe" but right now it's time for chuck todd and "the daily rundown." congress needs something to get something on paper. no news might be good news, if you want a deal as both sides work behind the scenes to find a way to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. >>> it's a family affair. the macks are here. they're both leaving congress next year, not on their own terms but not before trying to figure out our fiscal future and even they don't agree on what to do. >>> plus, a major fight over the role of labor and their power. it all unfolds in michigan. is it the new wisconsin? find out what is driving the big change in the state. that's home to one of the most powerful unions out there. the united auto workers. good morning from washington, tuesday, december 11th,
financial future. lou: day q4 being with us. baby it is cold outside. staten island knows it because soon they will feel it. bundle up once the temporary housing goes the chance to feel the season begins. i am neieil cavuto and those senators heaping prae had to know of the fast proaing -- approaching deadline this week a heap of trouble that did not stop politicians from heaping praise on those victims. >> the federal government sponded promptly and decisively. >> response has been robust. >> thank you for being such a strong leader. >> i am grateful f the productive conversations we have had. >> complement our e emergency responders they did an incredible job. neil: bidding aside the idiocy oo these remarks but the incredibly bad timing for thousands of out homes better in hotels and temporary housing. we hear th a government will take the punch bowl away when the shelter coverage ends despite their prediction from the government hself it may be months before they have a home. it seems sought on after two months it has made no contingency. don't be surprised if the folks to get the help
and move forward. >> bret: this makes michigan the 24th right to work state in the u.s. let's get an update now from the michigan capital. correspondent mike tobin is live in lansing. good evening. >> good evening, bret. what you can't see tonight in darkness is a column of state troopers surrounding the for's office building. they are armed with baton and wearing riot gear. from behind that column of protection, governor snyder made his announcement that michigan is now a right to work state. >> you put your hands on me, see what happens. >> as the demonstrations get raucous in lansing, tent for the group americans for prosperity is knocked down. >> they rushed the tent. chanting "go home, go home, scabs, scabs, scabs." they trampled the tent. people were inside. >> then they went after the cameras of journalists recording what happened. [bleep] >> the camera. >> i have a right to do this. >> finally, michigan state troopers armed with baton, tear gas and gas masks calmed the situation. demonstrators came from all over michigan and neighboring states. united auto worker, teamsters, brother
of us again. we're going to do everything we can to keep michigan competitive. >> reporter: economists say right-to-work laws do attract more business, but employees are paid less. there's a lot of disagreement over just how much of an impact right-to-work laws can have on a state's economy. in general, experts say so many factors go into a company's decision to expand or locate in a certain state that it's hard to point to right-to-work laws as an overriding factor. >> susan mcginnis, thank you very much. >>> to the fiscal cliff negotiations now. it is crunch time. with just three weeks before higher taxes and spending cuts kick in, negotiations are underway, but it's not known what if any progress is being made. speaking in michigan yesterday, the president said he's willing to compromise a little, but the gop wants to know specifics. danielle nottingham has more. >> reporter: president obama's campaign to steer clear of the fiscal cliff took him to a diesel engine plant outside detroit. >> congress doesn't act soon, meaning the next few weeks, starting on january 1, everybody's goin
for joining us. >> thank you for having me j that's "viewpoint" for tonight. i'll see you here tomorrow. [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> bill: hey, hey, hello everybody. bill hey, good morning everybody. welcome to the full-court press here on current tv this tuesday morning, december 11. getting close to that big day of christmas. but i'm not sure we're any closer to a deal to escape going over the fiscal cliff. good to see you this morning. welcome again to the program. and we welcome your calls at 1-866-55-press. in other big news, the supreme court has decided to hear two cases on marriage equality but why even bother to hold a hearing? hey, there's no doubt about it. under the constitution, it is wrong to discriminate against anybody for any reason. so, of course, gays and lesbians have every right under the constitution to marry each other. there is no doubt about it. we'll talk more about that today and a whole lot of other issues but first, we get the latest. here she is with today's current news update, lisa ferguson sta
of got sick at the same time. all of us sort of attributed it to, well, we're all stressed out. it's very cold. but that said, there is a lot of nasty stuff hanging about. >> ifill: and hari sreenivasan has an update on the dangerous working conditions in bangladesh, where more than 100 workers have died over the past month. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: president obama made another foray outside washington today, trying to build public support for a fiscal cliff agreement. it came a day after he resumed talking with the top house republican, and as a year-end deadline moved
and citizens behind us, at least six tanks, if things get out of hand. we'll keep a close eye to see what role the military plays in this political crisis >> reza sayeh, a potentially violent situation going on in egypt if those two groups cross paths. thank you. >>> this morning calming words on syria amid fears the crumbling regime could unleash chemical weapons on its own people. days after the u.s. and other countries warned embattled president bashar al assad against such action, defense secretary leon panetta says syria may be backing away from the threat. here is what pa net ta said early this morning on a flight to kuwait city. >> we haven't seen anything new indicating any aggressive steps to move forward in that way, but we continue to monitor it very closely and we continue to make clear to them that they should not under any means make use of these chemical weapons against their own population. >> and here's an example of how just murky the divisions are in syria, later today washington will declare one of the group of rebels a foreign terrorist organization. according to federal d
the rhetoric being used by some on the other side to describe this tax relief, i would like to take this time to correct the record. but first during this talk about the fiscal cliff and about the tax cuts that sunset at the end of the year, all we've been hearing since the election is about what are we going to do about taxes? that's a very significant thing as a result of the last election because i think it's a foregone conclusion there's going to be more revenue raised. but if we raise the amount of revenue that the president wants raised and raise it from the 2% that he wants to raise it from -- the wealthy -- that's only going to run the government for eight days. so what do you do the other 357 days? or if you look at the deficit, it will only take care of 7% of the $1 trillion-plus deficit that we have every year. what about the other 93%? so the point being that we can talk about taxes and taxes and taxes, but it's not going to solve the fiscal problems facing our nation. we don't have a taxing problem. we have a spending problem. and so we should have been spending the last three we
it is and what we do. everyone here is familiar with us. the work we are going to be presenting comes from a report that will be released during the hearing, during the presentation. gao-13-74, older americans act, to improve target and to meet equity. the older americans act was passed, to buy services to older adults and help them remain in their homes and communities, and provides very important services. title 3, provides support services like transportation and home delivered meals. title 3 provides care giver support. and the title 7, it provides protection activities to protect the rights of all vulnerable elderly people. in fiscal 2012, the title three had about $1.36 billion. title 7, $22 million. obviously, with the fiscal cliff discussions, these are sort of rounding errors. but as i am sure you all know, these are services the targeted community depends heavily on. and we know america is aging. america is getting older every day. i think 10,000 people retire every day. by 2030 is as -- it is estimated 20% of the population will be aged 65 and over. this really targets services
to you. put your hands on me and see what happens. >> this is -- >> leave us alone. leave us alone or we'll come for you and get you out of your position. >> eric: but this is probably the most dramatic fox news contributor getting sucker punched by the union thugs. watch. >> get the [bleep] out of my face. get the [bleep] out of my face. >> you hurt a lady -- >> i didn't hurt nobody. get the [bleep] out of my face. back off. back the [bleep] off. >> okay. [ yelling ] [bleep] [ yelling ] >> eric: so why so much anger? why the threat? the answer is simply this. the collective bargaining experiment in america is over. the unions are finished. whopping 20% of the workforce in michigan is one of the most unionized states in america. it's no coincidence that michigan is also the 46th worst state in unemployment. the unions know what is happening. they sense their demise. it's imminent. they're fighting to the bitter end. it won't matter. gor snider is doing what's best for the state? michigan is simply out of options. go to greg first but i'm listening to bob moo moan. what? union thuggery. >
vote early. >> your list of your photo i.d., utility bill, you can use all those things or you can when you are voting early, you write your name, address, date of birth, driver's license number, they will ask for it with your social security number or you can provide one of these 13 additional items in your signature a and a cross check that against the database, and that talks it works in our state. estimates are you voting early at your courthouse or are you voting early in the different areas. >> or the designated area members. >> in west virginia we have early voting in the courthouse and we also have what is called satellite. so, i am trying to figure out how you do that. how you cannot ask for -- >> because you are using the driver's license number or the last digits of the security number and checking that come and before that envelope is opened the check that against the statewide data base where is your signature excess of the electronic file and where all of that information access on the physical copy of it and then that is the same way if you vote by mail you are not we to
a city transit system where you don't have adequate capacity and passengers to use that facility, the same thing holds true anymore with passenger service. when i heard president obama and this administration, beginning to promote high speed rail, unfortunately most of the money, the $10 billion, does not go for high-speed rail. they chose instead to support almost 150 projects and that number is growing and a lot of that money has been left behind. in fact, most of the money that has been read dedicated to high speed rail has been sent back by states including my state, the state of florida, we had to switch a proposal for high-speed rail, the actual speed was 84 miles an hour. 84 miles for one hour transit the distance of the proposed link in central florida, that is not high speed. high speed -- by our definition, 110 miles per hour average. that doesn't mean the train gets up to 110, 150, 116 miles for some stretch. we are talking about the average speed. we are talking about a switch in ohio, looking at 39 miles to 58 miles an hour. that money was turned back. there was a si
spread across the country. also, "money" tonight, a crash for gas prices. they are tumbling across the u.s. it's an early christmas gift for drivers but we'll tell you if the relief will last through the new year. >>> pepsi is crazy in love with beyonce. the music icon inks a $50 million deal to pitch its products. can she really make you stop drinking coke though? i say pepsi just got hosed. but a top marketing expert is here to disagree with me. even when they say it's not it is always about money melissa: firss, let's look at the day's market headlines of the leave it to congress to suck the air out of a good thing. stocks soared in early trading on hopes of a deal on the fiscal cliff. but a parade of speeches by congressional leaders this afternoon dump ad whole lot of water on the rally. stocks pared back from session highs. dow closed down 78 points. even dollar stores are having trouble making money today. dollar general shares got hammered. they warned of sluggish growth ahead and margins that would likely remain flat. >>> urban outfitters is mailing holiday catalogs filled with f-
in my mobile or online banking. i just use my bank of america debit or credit card when i pay. and i get as much as 15% cash back -- put into my account. this is cash back on top of other rewards i already get. best of all -- it's free. happy holidays. [ male announcer ] introducing bankamerideals, free for online banking customers. sign in to your online banking to choose your deals today. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? ♪ >> gretchen: if you are just waking up it is 17 minutes past the top of the is it like a fire sale on america interest? china buying up u.s. companies on the cheap and we are paying interest on money we are borrowing from the communist company in the first place. a battery system is closed unless regalators stepped in. is it 123. >> it is a-123. >> gretchen: it went bankrupt. >> the judge holds an auction and a chinese company wins the auction and $256 mil
. >> because you're using the driver's license number or last four digits of your social security number and checking that. before that envelope is opened they check that against the statewide voter data fwace where your signature exists on electronic file and where all of that information exists or the physical copy of it. that's the same thing if you vote by mail. again, you don't leave home to vote in ohio. we have an entire buffet of options for voting and we have built in safeguards for doing so. >> that discussion just got extremely technical. >> it did. sorry. >> but there's a point to be made i think from how technical that discussion was. who are the people who are going to be implementing an i.d. requirement on election day? they are poll workers who work once or twice a year, get paid very little money and it's tough. and to be a poll worker. and it's tough with all these rules and the more technical they get, the more mistakes will be made. i wonder if there's something that just cries out for simplicity in terms of i.d. requirements, and maybe no i.d. requirements because it
training curriculum that includes the required font training conclude that fra expects us to complete the creek and by the end of this calendar year. finally, all stakeholder agreements need to be completed in order for fra to disperse obligated funds to project grantees. prior to publication of for a insured the grantees are all long-term projects completed service outcome agreements. these agreements outlined that result from the infrastructure investments. while every obligated all the funds within the mandated deadline, other required agreements related to maintenance and construction were not complete. that deadline for extending our funds in completing construction is september 2017, a compress timelines for complex projects such as creating a new rail corridor or expanding or reconfiguring an existing one. for projects with manus and construction agreements that remain outstanding, the time when for completion becomes even more compressed. short-term projects which were intended to stay in the economic recovery have also been delayed. fra originally planned on obligating funds
, december 11th, and this is "now." >>> joining us today political analyst and washington bureau chief for more jones david korn and communications director and an msnbc political analyst karen finish where i politico executive editor jim van dehigh, and chief national correspondent for the morning times magazine mark rubavich. >>> over at the white house president obama has no public events scheduled. meanwhile, over in michigan thousands of union members and supporters are protesting at the state capitol building in lancing. the state, which is the heart of the united autoworkers and ground zero for union rights is poised to sign a major anti-labor bill into law today. the president weighed in on that, speaking yesterday in redford. >> these right to work clause, they don't have anything with economics. they have everything to do with politics. what they're really talking about is giving you the right to work for less money. america is not going to compete based on low skill, low wage, no workers rights. that's not our competitive advantage. there's always going to be some other coun
'm not going to have a situation where the wealthiest among us, including folks like me, get to keep all our tax breaks and then we're asking students to pay higher student loans. >> reporter: even so, democrats worry mr. obama might cave to republicans, their biggest fear, the president will do what he considered in 2011, raise the eligibility age for medicare, a top house democrat monday warned the white house to tread lightly. >> now that would save a lot of money for the federal government and look good on the balance sheet but he's not going to vote for it and i'm not going to vote for it. >> reporter: this is a big part of the story to come. if there's a deal that's a huge break-through but lawmakers still have to vote for it and democrats oppose large structural cuts to medicare and most republicans oppose income tax rates on the so-called wealthy. that's why lawmakers were told not to make big fiscal travel plans because the crisis could go to new year's eve. >> political director john dickerson joins us. how does a unionized state like michigan become a right to work state and what
. the phone lines are open. also, send us a tweet or a facebook post, or send us an e- mail. here's what the president said yesterday in michigan. [video clip] >> these right to work law don't have to do with economics. they have everything to do with politics. what they are really talking about is giving you the right to work for less money. [cheers and applause] you only have to look to michigan, where workers were instrumental in reviving the auto industry and to see how unions have helped to build not just a straw upper-middle-class but a stronger america -- stronger middle-class but a stronger america. people and should be focused on the same pink. they should be working to make sure companies like this manufacturer is able to make more great products. that's what they should be focused on. host: distorts free press, courtesy of the newseum in washington, as this headline -- some schools are closed in the state so teachers can also protests that block today. here is the detroit news. there headline -- michigan pro-union people are protesting this law. the republican-led legislature
. for us to move forward in this situation we are in ohio, we need not overreact to stories and we need to seek ways of getting all the participants in the political process to admit that it is easy to follow and that fraud is rare. until we can overcome those misperceptions, i think it will be very hard to get that balance of a swing state like ohio. thank you. [applause] >> with such an esteemed panel, i feel like i should announce my candidacy for indiana secretary of state. [laughter] then i think about all the academic writings i have does it law professor and what the opposition would do with those. i think i will not. i work in indiana and i will talk about indiana and our experience so far with photo identification. indiana is important nationally for a couple of reasons. we were just about first -- is there anybody from georgia in the room? if there isn't, indiana will take credit for being first in line on photo identification. as a requirement. also, india has served as the model -- indiana has served as the model for photo identification laws that have been passed and litiga
the importance of the latino vote. for many of us that followed these issues from -- some like roberto with great expertise, others like me, with much more general recall -- generality, for the past couple of decree okayed we said the latino vote is going to matter in the national elections. this is the year the latino vote comes home. i think after a while we stopped believing it. we figured some day it bill be divisive factor. the you can can make a plausible argument that in this election it really was a decisive factors, and we can ask, how much of a decisive factor was it? how much did it matter in the outcome. not just the presidential rateraise but the congressional races and state races. why was it such a decisive factor? why now and not other teams -- times. how much was immigration policy factor in this? i think we'll hear from the panelists. these are actually different things, immigration policy has a different set of constituency, and to what extent did immigration policy play into this and are there effect ops immigration policy, and also ways that candidates approach issues that ma
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)